Boxing bag Interval Workout

February 17, 2010

 

Equipment needed:

Boxing Bag

Boxing Gloves

Hand Wraps

Interval Timer

This workout is one I did at home the other night, designed around tabata intervals. For more information on tabata interval training or interval training in general see my previous two posts – https://chelmarchioli.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/tabata-interval-training-sample-workouts/

https://chelmarchioli.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/interval-training-is-the-best-for-fat-loss/

For a quick recap tabata is a form of interval training using the method of 20 seconds of work followed by 10 seconds of rest x 8. This gives you 4 minutes doing any particular exercise you like. Today I’ve used boxing as an example. You can use most types of interval timers but the best I’ve seen is the gymboss application for the iphone.  Best thing about it is that it’s free!! (If you own an iphone)

Round 1:

  • Jab/Cross

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                          

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 2:

  • Lead Hook/Rear Hook

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                          

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 3:

  • Right Roundhouse Kicks

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                          

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 4:

  • Left Roundhouse Kicks

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                         

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 5:

  • 3 Punch Timing (use the 4 punches we’ve previously worked on, Jab, Cross, Lead Hook and Rear Hook to create any 3 punch combination you like. If you are a beginner or not so confident punching the bag then pick a set 3 punch combination and stick to that for the entire 4 minutes)

E.g.  Jab, Cross, Lead Hook

Rear Hook, Lead Hook, Cross

Cross, Lead Hook, Rear Hook

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                          

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 6:

  • 4 punch timing (use the 4 punches we’ve previously worked on, Jab, Cross, Lead Hook and Rear Hook to create any 4 punch combination you like. If you are a beginner or not so confident punching the bag then pick a set 4 punch combination and stick to that for the entire 4 minutes)

E.g.  Jab, Cross, Lead Hook, Rear Hook

Rear Hook, Lead Hook, Cross, Lead Hook

Jab, Cross, Lead Hook, Cross

Advanced: aim for 20+                           

Intermediate: aim for 15+                          

Beginner: aim for 10+

Round 7: Conditioning Round

  • Push Up + Plank Challenge

 Advanced                   10 push ups

                                    6 seconds plank

                                    9 push ups

                                    6 seconds plank

                                    8 push ups

                                    6 seconds plank

Intermediate:             7 push ups

                                    6 seconds plank

                                    6 push ups

                                    6 seconds plank

Beginner:                    5 push ups

                                   6 seconds plank

                                   4 push ups

                                   6 seconds plank

                                   3 push ups

                                   6 seconds plank

                                  2 push ups

                                  6 seconds plank

                                  1 push up

                                  6 seconds plank

Note: You can either choose push ups from the toes or knees. If doing push ups from the toes your knees shouldn’t touch the ground until you have finished. You can transfer from hands to forearms with out your knees dropping to the floor. This will make it much harder and challenging for you!

Feel Free to choose a number to start on or even try doing this in reverse by starting at 1 and seeing how far you can get.

If this is too easy for you then simply climb your way back up to ten! And yes I mean do it twice!

Have fun!

P.S.  If you want to know more about the benefits of boxing on your health and fitness check out a previous blog entry – https://chelmarchioli.wordpress.com/2009/07/14/the-benefits-of-boxing-for-fitness/


Tabata Interval Training – Sample Workouts

February 12, 2010

Tabata is a form of high intensity interval training. The Tabata protocol is made up of 20 seconds of work, immediately followed by 10 seconds of rest, then complete the sequence 8 times! That gives you a total of 4 minutes!

3 reasons why Tabata interval training works:

  1. It allows you to effectively manage your time and plan the perfect workout.
  2. You can use any exercise whether it’s cardio or resistance based to put into the Tabata format.
  3. High intensity interval training such as Tabata is best for fat loss. It increases calorie expenditure during and for up to 38 hours after exercise due to excess post exercise oxygen consumption – EPOC. (See the article Steady state aerobic training vs anaerobic interval training – https://chelmarchioli.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/interval-training-is-the-best-for-fat-loss/)

 Here are 3 different situations you may be in where you can use my sample tabata interval programs depending on equipment and location. Remember the 4 minutes is made up of 20 seconds of work, followed by 10 seconds of rest, x 8! Take a minute break after each exercise to rest and change over and set up for the next set of intervals. All three work outs can be completed in 30 minutes. If you had more or less time to workout then you can add or take an exercise away, Just allow 5 minutes per exercise.

Gym:

Bike – seated climb (4/8) sprints (4/8) (4 mins)

1 min rest

Lat Pulldown (4mins)

1 min rest

 Rower – sprints (4mins)

1 min rest

Chest Press (4mins)

1 min rest

Cross trainer – sprints (4mins)

1 min rest

Leg Press (4 mins)

No Equipment:

Running – (4 mins)

1 min rest

Push ups (4mins)

1 min rest

Burpees (4mins)

1 min rest

Mountain climbers (4mins)

1 min rest

Dynamic lunges (4mins)

1 min rest

Step ups (4mins)

 

Boxing equipment:

Boxing – Jabs  (4mins)

1 min rest

Push ups (4mins)

1 min rest

Boxing – hooks (4mins)

1 min rest

squats (4mins)

1 min rest

Boxing – Uppercuts (4mins)

1 min rest

Bodyweight – abdominal brace (4mins)

Ok, now you’ve got the idea you can go ahead and try some of these workouts for yourself. You can put anything you like into these workouts to target specific goals you may have. One advantage to have would be a gym boss interval timer or some other kind of timer you can set this up on. You can buy them from Hart Sport Australia or get the FREE application on your iphone.

Let me know how you go and if you’ve got any other great workouts that you may have done or created yourself then please leave a comment. Have fun!!


Sample programs for children aged 6-18 years

July 12, 2009

The Australia Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA) have put together some sample programs designed for children and youth. Keep in mind that these are based on young athletes rather than children who don’t have a sporting background. It is not intended that these programs be the only programs allowable for children or youth to use and modifications to the programs will be required depending upon the individual characteristics of the children, training goals, available equipment, and training time. However, model program are developed to serve as useful examples from which individual specific training programs may be developed and employed. It is the position of the ASCA that all programs performed by children must be strictly coached by an adult and that the adult be accredited with at least a Level 1 ASCA Strength and Conditioning coaching accreditation and to coach youth in level 3 and 4 in the more complex lifts a coaching accreditation of at least a ASCA Level 2 would be required. Children need to receive comprehensive instruction on relevant safety issues prior to the commencement of training.

Level 1: 6-9 years

Level 1 programs are designed for young children 6 to 9 years of age or any older child who is just starting out in resistance training and conditioning. Appropriate programs involve modified body weight type exercises and light resistance work performed for relatively high repetitions e.g. 15+ reps. The goal over this period is to have the children become accustomed to regular training, develop basic fitness abilities such as strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, co-ordination and flexibility in a safe, low stress, fun environment. The specific muscular function goals during this period are:

1. Hover in a horizontal position with feet, elbows and forearms touching the ground and straight back position for 60 s.

2. Perform 10 well controlled back extensions to horizontal.

3. Perform 10 well controlled full range double leg squats with hands behind the head and feet flat on the floor.

4. Perform 10 well controlled push ups off their toes chest to touch the ground and arms achieve full extension.

5. Perform 5 well controlled lunges each leg with back knee touching the ground and good balance.

6. Wall squat at 90 degrees for 60 s.

7. Touch their toes in the sit and reach test.

A beginning program would comprise a basic 3 day per week circuit type whole body program performed on alternate days (i.e. Monday, Wednesday and Friday) of the following exercises:

Basic warm up (5 minute jog or cycle plus 2-3 minutes of dynamic stretching)

1. Step ups (both left and right legs) – 20 to 30 cm step or chair

2. Push ups (- off knees initially progressing onto toes as strength increases

3. Star jumps

4. Abdominal crunches – as strength increases progress towards bent legged sit ups

5. Chair dips – initially have legs close to the chair and use the legs and arms to raise the body as strength increases progressively move legs further away from the chair

6. 90 degree wall sit

7. Reverse back extensions

8. Hover – initially off knees progressing to toes

Cool down and stretch – (5 min jog or cycle and 5 minutes of stretching)

Progression:

Week 1: Perform 20 s of each exercise for as many controlled repetitions as possible followed by 40 s rest and then move onto the next exercise. Perform 1 circuit – total workout time approximately 25 minutes (including warm up and cool down). Once this circuit is comfortably achieved by the athlete progress onto stage 2.

Stage 2: Perform 30 s of each exercise for as many controlled repetitions as possible followed by 40 s rest and then move onto the next exercise. Perform 1 circuit – total workout time approximately 27 minutes (including warm up and cool down). Once this circuit is comfortably achieved by the athlete progress onto stage 3

Stage 3: Perform the same as stage 2 but repeat the circuit 2 times – total workout time approximately 38 minutes. Once this circuit is comfortably achieved by the athlete progress onto stage 4.

Stage 4: Perform 2 circuits but increase exercise time to 40 s per exercise with 50 s recovery -total workout time approximately 40 minutes. Once this circuit is comfortably achieved by the athlete progress onto stage 5.

Stage 5: Perform 2 circuits but increase exercise time to 50 s per exercise with 50 s recovery -total workout time approximately 43 minutes. Once this circuit is comfortably achieved by the athlete progress onto stage 6.

Stage 6: Perform 2 circuits but increase exercise time to 60 s per exercise with 60 s recovery -total workout time approximately 47 minutes. At this stage the athlete can keep the same circuit but try and increase the intensity of some of the exercises. For example, some options include:

> Increasing the step height for the step ups

> Push ups off toes rather than knees

> Progress from crunches to bent legged sit ups

> Chair dips performed with legs progressively further from the chair

> Hover off toes rather than off knees

Increase the intensity progressively by gradually including these changes. For example, initially the first 30 s of the hover may be performed off the toes with the remaining time off the knees etc. Conversely, there may be some particularly heavy children who are unable to perform 20 s of push ups off their knees and for these children modifications such as the performance of push up off a wall or bench will be initially more appropriate.

Over time, with continued adaptation, additional exercises may be added or substituted such as:

> Lying pull ups performed from under a small table or off a low bar (e.g. smith machine bar)

> Isolated DB exercises such as DB arm curls, triceps kickback, lateral raises

> Lunges

> DB Squats

> Normal back extensions instead of reverse back extension

However, in all cases workouts should be limited to 3 whole body routines per week performed on alternate days for a duration not exceeding 1 hour in total.

There are many variations that could be done to the above program. The use of time rather than a prescribed repetition number has been employed as it is often easier to co-ordinate and focus children, especially when in a small group, to a time of exercise rather than a repetition number. Have them focus on performing controlled repetitions rather than rush to get to a particular repetition number. Further, the above programs have been developed with minimal equipment requirements so that they may be adopted by the greatest number of children who may not have access to specialised resistance training equipment and can perform the exercises from home or in a school classroom.

Level 2: 9-12 years

At level 2 the programs begin to incorporate some free weights and machine weight exercises as well as body weight activities. Again it is essential that the programs adopted be strictly supervised by an adult with at least a Level 1 ASCA Strength and Conditioning accreditation and the machines used be an appropriate size for the children. A beginning program for level 2 would comprise a basic 3 day per week whole body program performed on alternate days (i.e. Monday, Wednesday and Friday) of the following exercises:

Basic warm up (5 minute jog or cycle plus 2-3 minutes of dynamic stretching)

1. Lunges (initially using body weight but progressing to include light dumbbells when appropriate)

2. Machine Leg Press

3. Barbell Bench Press

4. Wide Grip Lat Pull down to the Front

5. Dumbbell Row

6. Back Extensions

7. Triceps Pushdown

8. Dumbbell Arm Curl

9. Hanging Knee Raises

Cool down and stretch – 10 minutes

The repetition range is between 10 to 15-RM with a maximal loading of 60% of the 1-RM. Initially the program should commence with 1 set of each exercise with 1-2 minutes rest between exercises, progressively building up to 3 repeated sets with 1-2 minutes rest between sets, as the child advances and can readily tolerate the increased training volume.

The goal of the program is to progressively develop the physical capacities of the children to be capable of achieving the following list of physical competencies at the age of 12:

1. Satisfy the requirements for Level 2.

2. Hover in a horizontal position with feet, elbows and forearms touching the ground and straight back position for 90 s.

3. Perform 10 well controlled repetitions of barbell bench press using a load of 40% of body weight.

4. Perform 10 well controlled repetitions of dumbbell rowing using a load of 15% of body weight in each hand.

5. Perform 10 well controlled lying pull ups with legs out straight using underhand grip.

6. Perform 10 well controlled lunges each leg with back knee touching the ground and good balance holding a load of 10% of body weight in each hand

7. Reach 5 cm beyond their toes in the sit and reach test.

Level 3: 12-15 years

At level 3 the programs begin using progressively more free weight exercises but avoid complex lifts such as cleans, snatches, deadlifts and squats etc unless competent coaching is available from a coach with at least a Level 2 ASCA strength and conditioning accreditation. Again it is essential that the programs adopted be strictly supervised by an adult with at least a Level 1 ASCA Strength and Conditioning accreditation and the equipment used be an appropriate size for the children.

A beginning program for level 3 would comprise a basic 3 day per week whole body program performed on alternate days (i.e. Monday, Wednesday and Friday) of the following exercises:

Basic warm up (5 minute jog or cycle etc plus 2-3 minutes of dynamic stretching)

1. Front barbell squats

2. Step ups holding dumbbells

3. Barbell bench press

4. Chin ups – initially using a close grip and restricted range of motion but progressing to a full range of motion as strength develops

5. Back extensions – with a 2 s pause at top

6. Hanging leg raises or Inclined sit ups

7. DB seated overhead press

8. Parallel bar dips or Bench dips if not sufficiently strong to perform 8 repetitions

9. Hover – Circuit: 60 s 2 arms to front and 30 s 1 arm each side (side hover)

10. Barbell Arm Curls

Cool down and stretch – 10 minutes

The repetition range is between 8 to 15-RM with a maximal loading of 70% of the 1-RM. Initially the program should commence with 2 sets of each exercise with 1-2 minutes rest between sets, progressively building up to 4 repeated sets as the youth advances and can readily tolerate the increased training volume. Towards the end of level 3 the youth may start employing pyramid loading where the loading can be increased on subsequent sets with a lighter drop set employed for the final set.

The goal of the program is to progressively develop the physical capacities of the children to be capable of achieving the following list of physical competencies at the age of 15:

1. Satisfy the requirements for Levels 2 and 3.

2. Hover in a horizontal position with feet, elbows and forearms touching the ground and straight back position for 120 s.

3. Perform 5 well controlled full range single leg squats each leg.

4. Perform 10 well controlled parallel bar dips for boys and 10 bench dips for girls with legs out straight.

5. Perform 10 well controlled chin ups for boys and a 30 s arm hang at 90 degree elbow angle for girls (underhand grip).

6. Perform 10 well controlled repetitions of barbell bench press using a load of 70% of bodyweight for boys and 50% of body weight for girls.

Level 4: 15-18 years

At level 4 the programs are progressively moving towards an advanced adult program involving split routines where appropriate and complex multi-joint movements provided sound technique has been developed under competent coaching by a coach with at least Level 2 ASCA strength and conditioning accreditation. The repetition range is between 6 to 15 RM with a maximal loading of 80% of the 1 RM.

A beginning program for level 4 would comprise a basic 3 day per week whole body program performed on alternate days (i.e. Monday, Wednesday and Friday) of the following exercises:

Warm up – 10 mins on bike

1. Major chest exercise (Bench press, Incline bench press or DB press)

2. Overhead shoulder press (Clean and press, Standing military press or Seated press behind neck)

3. Upper back exercise (Chins, Lat pull or DB pullover)

4. Triceps (Dips, Lying triceps extension or Triceps pushdown etc)

5. Major leg exercise (Squat, Leg press or Hack squat)

6. Lower back exercise (Deadlift or Back extension)

7. Hanging leg raise (holding light 1-3 kg medicine ball between legs when strong enough)

8. Major bicep exercise (Standing DB curls, EZ curls or Preacher curls)

9. Inclined sit ups or Hover circuit

10. Calf raises

Cool down and Stretch – 10 mins

Should change specific exercises throughout the week:

• Mon and Fri perform Barbell Bench Press, Wed Inclined Bench Press

• Mon Clean and Press, Wed Standing military press, Friday Press behind neck

• Mon Chins, Wed DB Pullover, Fri Lat pulldown

• Mon Squat, Wed Leg Press, Fri Hack Squat

• Mon and Fri Deadlift, Wed Back Extension etc

The repetition range is between 6 to 15-RM with a maximal loading of 80% of the 1-RM. The program should consist of 3-4 sets of each exercise with 2-3 minutes rest between major exercises such as clean and press, squats, deadlifts and 1-2 minutes rest between sets for more basic exercises such as back extensions, sit ups. The youth is encouraged to employ pyramid loading techniques where the loading can be increased on subsequent sets with a lighter drop set employed for the final set. For youth wishing to increase training intensity, muscle strength and size and move towards a split routine towards the end of Level 4 the following training recommendations are provided:

2 Way Split Routine: After 12 months on the above whole body program the individual may choose to up the intensity and volume and move to a 2 way split routine. This involves splitting the body in 2 and performing each workout 2 times per week, thus 4 workouts per week. The ASCA preferred way to achieve this is to split the body into:

Day 1: Upper Body (Chest, Shoulders, Triceps, Upper Back and Biceps): Monday and Friday. Day 2: Lower Body (Legs, Lower Back and Stomach): Wednesday and Saturday

However, there are other methods to achieve this, for example push: pull split routines. By splitting the body in two more exercises can be performed per session and a more intense workout per body part achieved with longer to recover prior to the next session.

Example of 2 Way Split Routine

Monday and Friday – Upper Body (Chest, Shoulders, Triceps, Upper Back and Biceps)

Warm up – 10 mins on bike

1. Bench press

2. Inclined bench press or DB Flies

3. Standing push press

4. DB Lateral raises or Rear deltoid exercise

5. Chin Ups

6. DB Pullovers or Bench pull

7. Dips

8. Lying Triceps Extension

9. DB Twist and Turn Biceps Curls

Cool down – 10 mins stretching

• 3-4 sets of 6-15 reps with about 1-3 minutes rest between sets.

Wednesday and Saturday –

Lower Body (Legs, Lower Back and Stomach):

Warm up – 10 mins on bike

1. Squats

2. Deadlifts or Cleans

3. Leg press

4. DB lunges

5. Leg Curls

6. Back Extensions with additional loading

7. Calf Raises

8. Russian twists with medicine ball or Inclined sit ups with rotation

9. Hanging leg raises with light medicine ball between legs

Cool down – 10 mins stretching

• 3-4 sets of 6-15 reps with about 1-3 minutes rest between sets.

Conclusion:

  • You can see how from 6 years old you have certain requirements to get to the 15-18 age group or ‘level 4’ group. Not only is it age based but it also has the physical competencies component to ensure each child or youth is ready to step up to the next level.
  • Each child or youth should be supervised by an accredited strength and conditioning                                            coach to ensure safety and the correct development of the child under the appropriate guidelines.
  • You can see the difference in difficulty between one level and the next. This is why the child has to obtain the physical competencies to be ready for the next level. The main goal of their current level is to acquire the physical competencies so they can move on to the next stage of development when they reach the appropriate age.

For more information visit the website – www.strengthandconditioning.org – and click on the resistance training in children and youth position stand. Also if you have any questions feel free to ask.


Group exercise for kids

June 2, 2009

I’ve recently started a program for kids at Endorphin Gym in Kingston. It’s called Kid Fit and its designed for 8 – 12 year olds.

In the build up to todays first session i assessed all the kids prior to the fisrt session. The first thing i noticed is how quickly these kids want to grow up. 

Almost every one of the kids, when i asked them how old they were, they said their actual age and then straight away said how old they were turning.

For example, one kid when i asked ‘how old are you?’, said to me “I’m 11 turning 12”, i was thinking that their birthday must be coming up in the next week or so.. so i asked ‘When is your birthday?’. They replied “november’. Meanwhile here we are in May.. still at least 5 months away from their birthday! I’m 19..i’m not turning 20. Things start to get serious when you reach the twenties!

Anyway the day of the first session comes. I try and squeeze in 4 assessment before the start of the session. Things were pretty busy with kids coming and going that i hardly had time to plan the session.

10 kids rock up to the first session which is a pretty decent number considering we’d only advertised it two weeks earlier. All these kids were so different. Some played soccer, some football, swimming, horse riding, some did dancing, some had never done a push up or sit up before and some kids couldn’t do two skips in a row so the challenge for me was to structure the class so there was something for everyone.

The class started well doing some aerobics based exercise such as step ups,skipping and running and jumping. Then came the resistance exercises.

My aim is to teach good technique and develop a solid strength base so we can run a more circuit formatted class. But for now we would all do the same thing so i could watch them all and walk around and correct them.

It was a new experience seeing the way kids work. The thing that stood out the most was one kid who had a bit more troube than the others in terms of learning new things.

Here i am trying to give all the kids options, so i run  through 4 types of push ups that they could do. The first was against a wall in a standing position. The second was on the knees with hands on the aerobics stage. The third was a knee push up and the fourth was a push up on their toes.

So i ask this kid which option he was going to do.. thinking he’d take the wall or aerobic stage option but no, without hesitation he says ‘I’m going to do the toe push ups’.

So off he went, i watched closely and he didn’t get one push up out, i can’t possibly describe what he was doing but it definately wasn’t a push up so i told him to try some on the stage which he was able to do about 5 good ones before going back to some crazy dance routine.. well thats what it looked like!

Although he couldn’t do a full one it was really good to see that he endeavoured to be as good as the others and knows where he wants to progress to.  These are the types of kids who are great to work with. Because one day down the track he’ll come in to one of the sessions and there he’ll be pumping out full push ups with proper technique and i’ll say to him ‘remember the first time you came in and could only do 5 proper ones on your knees against the stage?’ and they’ll think back and realise how far they’ve progressed and what they really can achieve if they’re given the chance. And for me that is the most rewarding thing to see. I can’t wait!

This is what Kid Fit is all about. It giving those kids the initial opportunity and knowledge to a healthy life through an emphasis on fun classes with other kids who are in the same boat as each other. 

CHEL