Tabata Interval Training – Sample Workouts

February 12, 2010

Tabata is a form of high intensity interval training. The Tabata protocol is made up of 20 seconds of work, immediately followed by 10 seconds of rest, then complete the sequence 8 times! That gives you a total of 4 minutes!

3 reasons why Tabata interval training works:

  1. It allows you to effectively manage your time and plan the perfect workout.
  2. You can use any exercise whether it’s cardio or resistance based to put into the Tabata format.
  3. High intensity interval training such as Tabata is best for fat loss. It increases calorie expenditure during and for up to 38 hours after exercise due to excess post exercise oxygen consumption – EPOC. (See the article Steady state aerobic training vs anaerobic interval training – https://chelmarchioli.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/interval-training-is-the-best-for-fat-loss/)

 Here are 3 different situations you may be in where you can use my sample tabata interval programs depending on equipment and location. Remember the 4 minutes is made up of 20 seconds of work, followed by 10 seconds of rest, x 8! Take a minute break after each exercise to rest and change over and set up for the next set of intervals. All three work outs can be completed in 30 minutes. If you had more or less time to workout then you can add or take an exercise away, Just allow 5 minutes per exercise.

Gym:

Bike – seated climb (4/8) sprints (4/8) (4 mins)

1 min rest

Lat Pulldown (4mins)

1 min rest

 Rower – sprints (4mins)

1 min rest

Chest Press (4mins)

1 min rest

Cross trainer – sprints (4mins)

1 min rest

Leg Press (4 mins)

No Equipment:

Running – (4 mins)

1 min rest

Push ups (4mins)

1 min rest

Burpees (4mins)

1 min rest

Mountain climbers (4mins)

1 min rest

Dynamic lunges (4mins)

1 min rest

Step ups (4mins)

 

Boxing equipment:

Boxing – Jabs  (4mins)

1 min rest

Push ups (4mins)

1 min rest

Boxing – hooks (4mins)

1 min rest

squats (4mins)

1 min rest

Boxing – Uppercuts (4mins)

1 min rest

Bodyweight – abdominal brace (4mins)

Ok, now you’ve got the idea you can go ahead and try some of these workouts for yourself. You can put anything you like into these workouts to target specific goals you may have. One advantage to have would be a gym boss interval timer or some other kind of timer you can set this up on. You can buy them from Hart Sport Australia or get the FREE application on your iphone.

Let me know how you go and if you’ve got any other great workouts that you may have done or created yourself then please leave a comment. Have fun!!

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Why anaerobic interval training is the best training method for fat loss

February 12, 2010

 

Have you ever wondered what the best , most time efficient wat to lose fat is?

Have you been told totally different things about what is the best training method for fat loss?

Read this article from Ultrafit Magazine and it will hopefully clear this issue up for you.

Commonly, interval training has only been used as a time efficient way to increase anaerobic fitness or sport-specific power endurance in the final weeks before competition. However, new research on interval training has shown it to be a very efficient method of fat burning.

Consider some of the following on steady state aerobic training and fat loss:

  • A 1996 study showed that the addition of 5 x 45 minute sessions of aerobic training sessions per week for 12 weeks had no effect on fat loss.
  • A 2007 study showed that 5 x 50 minute of aerobic training per week for 6 months had no effect on fat loss.
  • A 2008 study showed that 3 x 40 minutes of aerobic exercise per week for 15 weeks actually resulted in a fat increase!

 And now consider the following about interval/anaerobic training and fat loss:

  • A 1994 study actually showed that interval training reduced body fat by nine times more than traditional cardio training, despite using few calories during the session and taking less time.
  • A 1999 study showed that the addition of a resistance training program to fat loss increased its effectiveness by 35% over diet and purely aerobic training.
  • The same study showed that 3 x 50 minute sessions of aerobic training for 12 weeks (36 sessions) increased fat loss by only 450g over diet alone.
  • The rise in metabolism after anaerobic training (Excess Post Exercise Oxygen Consumption – EPOC) results in further calories being burnt for up to 38 hours after the finish of the session.

 

The indicators are clear: this type of information should go a long way in helping fitness professionals design and implement effective fat loss programs. It’s not the workout – it’s the effect of that workout on EPOC.

EPOC is defined scientifically as the “recovery of metabolic rate back to pre-exercise levels”. It can require several minutes for light exercise and several hours for hard intervals.

In layman’s terms it means you keep burning calories at an increased rate after a workout.

If you can imagine a big forest fire, you understand that it doesn’t just burn for an hour and then burn out – it gradually burns out so that over time there is no fire anymore. The peak of the fire may have been a long time ago but there are still flames being produced for a long time afterwards.

We call this the afterburn – metabolic disturbance – elevating EPOC to maximise calorie burn for the 23+ hours per day. Is there much of a real world effect of burning 300 calories per workout (e.g. aerobic work) if we don’t elevate EPOC??

If we could elevate EPOC even an apparently insignificant ¼ of a calorie per minute for the 38 hours that the study showed, then that 31 minute resistance workout would burn maybe 300 calories during the session plus the extra 570 calories over the next 38 hours. That becomes very significant.

In the past, fitness professionals and researchers have looked at how much fat is burned during the exercise session itself. This is extremely short sighted.

As American conditioning guru Alan Aragon said “Caring how much fat is burned during training makes as much sense as caring how much muscle is built during training.”

Think about that. If we looked at a weight training session that started at 9am and finished at 10am – how much muscle would we see built if we stopped at 10am? None.

In fact we’d see muscle damage. We could make the conclusion that weight training does not increase muscle – in fact it decreases muscle, right? It’s only when we look at the big picture – and look at the recovery from the session – that we find the reverse is true – weight training builds muscle.

Fat loss is the same way. Someone talking about the benefits of the “fat burning zones” or “fasted cardio” is a sure sign that the individual has stopped looking at the end of the exercise session. They have come to the conclusion that, lower intensity steady state exercise burns the most fat and made the massive leap of faith to suggest it’s the best for fat loss.

Using that same logic, these same people would suggest avoiding weight training if you want to grow muscle.

Take home message – focus on the afterburn, not just what happens during the exercise session

There is another, more subtle reason why intervals are superior to steady state training.

The body does the opposite.

If you don’t drink enough water your body will retain it. If you drink too much water your body will excrete it.

Article from Ultrafit Magazine

Issue 123 Jan/Feb 2010


Are you overweight? How do you measure up?

July 21, 2009

How do you know if you’re overweight? Are the scales really telling the truth? Yeah you might be overweight but is that because of lean muscle mass or because of fat?

The best way to find out how much fat you’re carrying is to conduct these 5 tests below and see if you fall into the healthy ranges in each test.

  1. Weight
  2. Girth measurements
  3. Waist circumference
  4. Body fat %
  5. Body Mass Index (BMI)

Weight – Most people use weight as the only test to determine their health. Unfortunately our scales can only tell us how heavy we are. We really need to know how much of our weight comes from muscle, bones, fluid and fat. However, weight is a starting point and will give an indicator of where you are at.

Girth Measurements – All you need is a tape measure for this one. You can measure many sites of the body but the main ones are waist, hips, chest and thighs. You can also measure your calves and upper arms. Remember to pull the measuring tape firm and keep it parallel to the floor. If possible take the measurements directly on your skin rather than over clothes. You can check these measurements every 3-4 weeks.

Waist circumference – This measure is an indicator of abdominal fat. A waist circumference above 94 centimetres for men, and 80 centimetres for women, is associated with a greater risk of health problems. Higher than 102 centimetres for men, and 88 centimetres for women is associated with serious health risks! An ideal waist circumference would be below 94 for men and less than 80 for women. Another measurement used to assess your risk of obesity-related disease is your waist to hip ratio. You get this by dividing your waist circumference by your hip measurement. For example, if your waist was 90 centimetres, and your hip was 100 centimetres, your hip to waist ratio will be: 90  100 = 0.9. Ideal waist to hip ratio is less than 0.9 for men and less than 0.8 for women.


Body fat % – The measurement of body fat consists of total fat throughout the body. You can use skin fold callipers or bio-electrical impedance scales to obtain this measurement. Leave room for error when using these methods but it will give you a fairly decent measure of where you are at in terms of body fat %. The distribution of body fat also needs to be looked at: fat stored around the abdomen is dangerous fat. It’s associated with a greater risk of disease, in particular heart disease; whereas fat stored around the hips and thighs is far less harmful.

CLASSIFICATION

MEN

WOMEN

LEAN

< 12%

< 17%

ACCEPTABLE

12 – 20.9 %

17 – 27.9 %

MOD. OVERWEIGHT

21 – 25.9 %

28 – 32.9 %

OVERWEIGHT

> 26 %

> 33 %

Body Mass Index – BMI is used as a general indicator of obesity. It’s used to define overweight, obese and underweight levels. To work out BMI, divide your weight in kilograms by your height squared. For example you weigh 100 kilograms and are 185 centimetres tall, the equation would be: 100 (1.85 x 1.85) = 29.2 (Overweight).

CLASSIFICATION

BMI

OBESITY CLASS

UNDERWEIGHT

< 18.5

NORMAL

18.5 – 24.9

OVERWEIGHT

25 – 29.9

OBESITY

30 – 34.9

I

35 – 39.9

II

EXTREME OBESITY

> 40.0

III

Remember BMI does not take into account muscle mass so ideally take all 5 of these measurements and see if they all point in one direction or not. If you’re not at where you want to be it’s time to start doing something about it. If you’re still not sure about your results or have any other questions, feel free to leave any questions or comments.


Setting goals works – how it can help your weight loss

July 15, 2009
Goal setting works! It’s as simple as that. It’s essential for anyone who wants to lose some extra weight no matter if its 5kg or 50kg you want to lose, goals are a necessity.
Here are some simple steps to planning and achieving your fat loss goals.

1. Write down your main goal. This is generally the total amount of weight or % of body fat you want to lose.

2. Give your number one goal a time frame. Setting a time frame is so important. Your time frame is predominately based around how much time and energy you can dedicate to reaching your number one goal. Ask yourself how important is achieving your goal to you on a scale of 1-10? From your answer decide how much time you can put towards achieving it.

3. Once you have your time frame you can break it up in to smaller goals. For example your goal is to lose 12kg in 3 months. You can set yourself smaller goals that are stepping stones towards your main goal. This may be ‘lose 1kg a week over the 3 month period’. By setting smaller goals that lead up to your number one goal you can monitor your progress and see what is working and what isn’t straight away.

4. Once you have your goals planned out on paper it’s time to do something about it. Get to the gym, sign up for a boot camp or exercise program, create a better eating plan, get out of the house more and do what you need to do to reach your goals! You need to make these lifestyle changes and stick to them for long term fat loss success.

5. The SMARTER your goal is the better!

Specific – the more specific your goal is the better. It gives you direction!

Measurable – you need to be able to know if you’ve achieved your goal. Lose weight isn’t a measurable goal. However lose 5kg in one month is very measurable.

Accountable – who is accountable for reaching your goals. 99% of the time you are!

Realistic – unrealistic goals will lead to discouragement. Not good for successful fat loss!

Time frame – decide on how long you will take to achieve your goal and stick to it.

Exciting – you should be excited about what it will be like when you reach this goal.

Recorded – record your progress somewhere that you see every day to keep you on track.

Whether it’s fat loss goals or any kind of goal using a method like this increases your chances of achieving it.


The Benefits of boxing for fitness

July 14, 2009

I don’t blame people for getting tired of the same old cardio machines when you use them day after day, week after week! It’s always great to try something different. Boxing for fitness adds that extra fun into your workout and also delivers great results.

Here are 5 ways boxing can help you!

1. Increase your fitness levels – boxing is based around high repetitions with rest in between work efforts. It’s a great interval training session and, when done with correct technique, will give your whole body a good workout.

2. Help you achieve your fat loss goals – boxing is great for losing that extra fat. Its high intensity and gets plenty of muscles moving and burning lots of calories. With the right format to your session you will see great results.

3. Increase your muscular tone – punching bags or pads requires your muscles to be working pretty hard throughout the session. If you’ve ever done a one on one boxing session you know the feeling of how hard your arms have to work towards the end of a one minute round of high intensity effort. By losing that bit of extra fat and toning up your muscles through boxing training you’ll soon be seeing the results.

4. Improved coordination and agility – technique is really important in boxing. Once you know the main punches your trainer can combine these punches into combos which can include weaves between certain punches.

5. Reduce stress – we all know when we get really angry we like to hit things or take our frustration out in some way. Boxing is a feel good workout. After a long hard day in the office there isn’t much better than letting it all out and having a fun, solid workout to make you feel great and put everything else behind you.

The best way to get started with boxing for fitness is to ask about it at your gym and get a trainer to take you for a few sessions or join a group boxing class to learn the right technique and good session formats.